Fun Little Project

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Check out this cute heart-shaped pot holder that I made from a kit!  I bought the kit at Jackman’s Fabrics in St. Louis while I was in town visiting my daughter.  They had these little pot holders on display and had kits made up with all different fabrics.  I wish I had bought more than one now because it was so easy to make.

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The kit came with all the fabrics you need, the pattern and very easy to understand instructions.

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You cut out the heart pieces.

The directions said to quilt these parts lightly so I just quilted along some of the lines in the fabric for a criss-cross design.

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Then add binding strips to the half heart pieces for the back.  Baste these heart pieces on and then put the heart front piece onto the back upside-down and stitch around the heart, leaving an opening to turn the whole thing right side out.  Then you just hand stitch the small opening you have left.

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I wish I had used the small bit of red I had left over to add a little hanging loop to one of the heart tops.  This thing is so cute, I would love to hang it in my kitchen!

Now that I have the directions and pattern, I can make more.  You really only need small amounts of fabric and batting.  I would need to buy some of the Insul-Bright batting for the inside.  This is a nice product to use on potholders because it keeps the heat from going though the potholder and burning you.

And by the way, these would make great little gifts for that friend that likes to cook!

A Tied Quilt

Since I’ve been on roll finishing so many quilts (and the weather has gotten cooler) I decided it was time to finish my Sister’s Choice quilt so I can use it on my bed.

I’ve been putting this off and I should have bought supplies while I was back in the states but I didn’t.  I looked at the PX to see if they had anything I could use and found some crochet thread and yarn and some larger needles.  I thought I could use the crochet thread to hand quilt the quilt with big stitches but I don’t have a thimble and it’s just too painful to do without.

Then I found the invisible tie online and remembered that we did that with a quilt at my Virginia church but you need a VERY long needle so that left me with tying the quilt with little knots.

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This method is usually used with utility quilts – often for kid’s quilts.  It’s not super pretty but it works fine.

The type of batting you use will determine how closely you need to put your ties.  I used a thin 100% cotton batting which doesn’t have to be quilted very closely.  6 inches apart is probably the maximum and obviously you want to put the ties in a pattern that’s pleasing to the eye and fits in with the overall quilt.  While this is a quicker method, it still took me 3 days to finish all the ties.  Once I finished the middle of the quilt, I thought maybe I could straight-line sew around the blue inner border.  I tried using my walking foot but I didn’t have much luck.  I ended up using a regular foot and a longer stitch to give it a homey look.  The goal is to keep that batting from shifting when you use the quilt.

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When I started cutting fabric for binding, I found I didn’t have enough.  I know – you’re not surprised since this happens all the time to me.  It’s my thing.  I’m the queen of strange bindings.  I did have enough of the light blue that I used for the border to bind 3 sides but then I had to use the bright blue for the last side.  Hey, it’s a scrap quilt!

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So now I just need to hand sew the back of the binding and this quilt is finished!  Kitty is giving it her stamp of approval.